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RELEASED FEBRUARY 2004

Three CDs totalling 46 tracks, including previously unreleased material from the Farlowe vaults of time.

See below for full track listings with details and
Terry Rawlings sleeve notes and interview with Chris.

Sorry, no more signed copies.

Other Credits

Compiled by
Kris Gray and Chris Farlowe
Track listing notes by
Kris Gray
Book notes by
Terry Rawlings
Mastered by
Chas Cronk
Executive Producers
Kris Gray and Chris Farlowe
Design by
JP3
Photographs courtesy of Chris Farlowe Collection
 


CHRIS FARLOWE:   ROCK n ROLL SOLDIER - ANTHOLOGY 1970-2004


DISC ONE



1. Where Do We Go From Here
(Mackay/Hammond/Waddell) - From the album 'From Here to Mama Rosa' produced by The Hill and originally released in 1970


2. Black Sheep
(Hammond) - From the album 'From Here to Mama Rosa' produced by The Hill and originally released in 1970


3. Mama Rosa
(Mackay/Hammond/Waddell) - From the album 'From Here to Mama Rosa' produced by The Hill and originally released in 1970


4. After Midnight
(Cale) - From the album 'Chris Farlowe Band Live' - originally released in 1975


5. Mandy
(English) - From the album 'Chris Farlowe Band Live' - originally released in 1975


6. Only Women Bleed
(Cooper/Wagner) - From the album 'Chris Farlowe Band Live' - originally released in 1975


7. The Thrill Has Gone
(Hawkins/Darnell) - From the album 'Out of the Blue' - produced by Mike Vernon and originally released in 1985


8. Ain't No Love in the Heart of the City
(Price/Walsh)- From the album 'Out of the Blue' - produced by Mike Vernon and originally released in 1985


9. One Night Stand
(Bickerton/Waddington) - From the album 'Born Again' - Produced by Mike Vernon and originally released in 1986


10. Born Again
(Davies/Dean) - From the album 'Born Again' - produced by Mike Vernon and originally released in 1986


11. Never Too Old to Rock
(Jupp) - From the album 'Born Again' - produced by Mike Vernon and originally released in 1986


12. Rock n Roll Soldier
(Seals) - From the album 'Waiting in the Wings' - produced by Tim Hinkley and originally released in 1992


13. On the Beach
(Crooks/Lyons/Nye) - From the album 'Waiting in the Wings' - produced by Leo Lyons and originally released in 1992


14. Some Mothers Son
(Farlowe/Moody) - From the album 'Waiting in the Wings' - produced by Tim Hinkley and originally released in 1992



DISC TWO



1. Chris's Shuffle
(Farlowe) - From the album 'Live in Berlin' - originally released in 1992


2. Stormy Monday
(Walker) - From the album 'Live in Berlin' - originally released in 1992


3. Giving it Up For Your Love
(Mason/Williams) - From the album 'Live in Berlin' - originally released in 1992


4. Bewitched
(Rogers/Hart) - From the album 'As Time Goes By' - recorded by Jon Hiseman - originally released in 1995


5. As Time Goes By
(Hupfield) - From the album 'As Time Goes By' - recorded by Jon Hiseman - originally released in 1995


6. These Foolish Things
(Strachey/Maschwitz) - From the album 'As Time Goes By' - recorded by Jon Hiseman - originally released in 1995


7. Language of the Heart
(Byrd) - From the album 'The Voice' - produced by Clem Clempson - originally released in 1999


8. Handbags and Gladrags
(D'Abo) - From the album 'The Voice' - produced by Kris Gray and Bill Kimber - originally released in 1999


9. All or Nothing
(Marriott/Lane) - From the album 'The Voice' - produced by Kris Gray and Bill Kimber - originally released in 1999


10. Miss You Fever
(Morgan/Sharkey) - From the album 'Glory Bound' - produced by Norman Beaker - Originally released in 2001


11. Tough On Me, Tough On You
(Mack/Lindsey) - From the album 'Glory Bound' - produced by Norman Beaker - Originally released in 2001


12. Glory Bound
(D'Abo) - From the album 'Glory Bound' - produced by Norman Beaker - originally released in 2001


13. Trouble
(Ahlers/Dillon)- From the album 'Farlowe That!' - produced by Kenny Denton and Kris Gray - originally released in 2003


14. Let's Get Together
(Dollison) - From the album 'Farlowe That!' - produced by Kenny Denton and Kris Gray - originally released in 2003


15. Ain't No Big Deal
(Campbell) - From the album 'Farlowe That!' - produced by Kenny Denton and Kris Gray - originally released in 2003



DISC THREE



1. Don't Wanna Sing the Blues No More
(Farlowe)


2. Lonesome Road
(Herrington)


3. My Foundation
(Beaker)


4. Out of Time
(Jagger/Richards) all tracks recorded live at the Gastroblues Festival Paks Hungary June 2000 - original versions of tracks 1,2 and 3 can be found on 'Lonesome Road' released in 1995 on Indigo Records


5. I'll Leave The Light On
(Marling/Smith) - full version of the song before being edited for 'Farlowe That' - produced by Kenny Denton and Kris Gray, previously unreleased


6. Man of the World
(Green) - originally recorded for 'Born Again' and produced by Mike Vernon - previously unreleased


7. One Night Stand
(Bickerton/Waddington) - produced by Wayne Bickerton - previously unreleased


8. Looking for Love in a Stranger
(Whittaker/Thompson) - produced by Wayne Bickerton - previously unreleased


9. Stand By Me
(Trott/O'Donnell) - produced by Wayne Bickerton - previously unreleased


10. Tired of Being Alone
(Green) - produced by Wayne Bickerton - previously unreleased


11. Tin Soldier
(Marriott/Lane) - recorded for 'The Voice' - produced by Kris Gray and Bill Kimber - previously unreleased


12. Crazy Mama
- recorded for 'The Voice' - produced by Clem Clempson - previously unreleased


13. Remind Me
- recorded for 'As Time Goes By' - recorded by Jon Hiseman - previously unreleased


14. Feel the Power of Love
(Reed/Stephens) - featuring a duet with Lorna B. and produced by Les Reed - this track was recorded for the Eurovision Song Contest in 2000


15. Circles Round the Sun
(Gatcheon) - produced by Jerry Ragavoy and recorded in New York in 1970 - previously released on BBC in Concert by Windsong International


16. Medicated Goo
(Miller/Winwood) - produced by Jerry Ragavoy and recorded in New York in 1970 - previously released on BBC in Concert by Windsong International


17. We Can Work It Out
(Lennon/McCartney) - released as a single in 1975









SO FARLOWE, SO GOOD



now we all know that Chris Farlowe's musical achievements during the 1960's fill some well-thumbed pages in the rock and roll history books. So much so, his work in the ensuing years tends to get somewhat overshadowed. 

Therefore this CD compilation goes some way in readdressing that balance. Not that we can resist (fact fans) in once again pointing out just what bought us up to this musical high point. By that we mean, lets add a little bit more to those pages and give you dear reader a brief history lesson. 


Chris's real name is actually John Henry Deighton but he changed that when he was bitten by the R+B bug in the early part of the 60's, spurning the country wide Skiffle craze and embarking on one of the longest running careers in British rock. He also put together one of the countries most formidable backing bands, "The Thunderbirds" a group that featured (at various times) the brilliant young guitar player Albert Lee, organist Dave Greenslade, piano player Nicky Hopkins, bass player Ricky Chapman, and drummer's Johnny Wise and Carl Palmer. They were instant club favourites at their regular residencies at places like the "The Flamingo" and "Klook's Kleek" where they belted out a potent mixture of Blues and soul covers.

Such was their popularity in 1962 that Chris and the band soon landed a one off deal with "
Decca Records" and recorded their debut 45 "Air Travel" which surprisingly, (considering their huge following at the time) failed to shift enough copy's to chart. 

However a switch to "
Columbia Records" the following year soon put things right and a string of respectable selling singles kept the band firmly in the public eye. Another label change came about in 1966, this time to the newly formed "Immediate Records" where Chris's most fertile period of recording got underway. 

This was helped in no small way by the encouragement he received from the label's (and
Rolling Stone's) boss Andrew Loog Oldham, for it was he who strongly suggested Chris record a couple of Jagger, Richards's compositions starting with the top forty "Think" and the massive number one "Out Of Time ". 

It's at this point you could be forgiven for thinking ah! The rest is indeed history 
I therefore need to read no further. Well you'd be wrong, because the
Chris Farlowe story is still unfolding! In fact by the late 60's it was only just beginning. 

Chris spent the later part of the 60's lauded among his peers and championed as having one of the UK's finest white soul voice's, the taller side of
Steve Marriott
He duetted with the legendary
Otis Redding on the equally legendary TV show Ready Steady Go and experimented with an extraordinary amount of musical styles that ranged from Pop and Jazz to Eastern influenced rhythms and gypsy-like folk. 

He also changed his image quite drastically and replaced his sharp mod togs with fringed jackets and buckskin while growing out his neat side parting. Well it was the 70's after all and this is where it started to get really interesting incidentally its also where this collection of faultless Farlowe favourites kicks off, and what better way to cram up on this master class in timeless tunes, and taste full talent than with the help of Chris himself. So if you'd all pay attention at the back we can begin.



___________________________________________________________________________________________



Q…After your initial flush of success, or indeed your second you seemed to take a completely different route in your career, one that suited the new era. You had turned away from R+B, Was this conscious decision?

No, Immediate had folded by that time and it left a lot of people high and dry, for want of a better phase and I was scratching around like a lot of guys. I'd been getting into all sorts of music by then so anything I did felt like a natural progression. I'd just finished an album called "From Here To Mama Rosa" with the band "The Hill" which was the most completely different and diverse thing I'd ever attempted up until that point. It was completely different and is still widely considered to be one of the albums I've ever done. It's all progression. 

The Hill were formed by ex Thunderbirds bass player Bruce Waddell, drummer Colin Davey, and keyboard player Peter Robinson, together with ex Fat Mattress guitar player Steve Hammond, and cellist Paul Buckmaster.

That album has fantastic songs, I love it. 


Q… So that wasn't a particular style of music you had sought out?

No, it was all done to the songs, a couple of members of my old band had wrote these great songs, Bruce Waddell in particular, and plus we had these great musicians. Peter Robinson who's a genius, and Paul Buckmaster on cello who did all of Bowie's and Elton John's stuff after me, great players. Also having a cello in the band was unheard of, that was a completely different thing. I liked it because I got to sing ballads and ballads are my forte. There's three tracks from that period "Black Sheep" which "Rainbow" later covered "Mama Rosa" its self which was about a drug dealer in London at the time, and "Where Do We Go From Here".

Q… Did you see your self-becoming part of the progressive rock scene in England at that time?

Once again no, I simply saw myself as being Chris Farlowe doing what he does best singing great songs with a great band. I don't think you can put me in any category because I've done everything from rock to heavy rock, from jazzy stuff, jazz rock you name it I've done it. 

Q
…After "The Hill" came "Colosseum" who were arguably at the forefront of what can only be described as the fusion of progressive rock, jazz and blues. In fact they were, in many resects one of the most ambitious groups of the time. Plus they were experimenting with all the musical styles that you your self was familiar with. Did that make you the obvious candidate or did you see your self as a singer for hire?

I consider myself a vocalist and a good one at that, so I think that's why they asked me. Once again it was something different and I wanted to take that challenge and see what we could do together. As for them they wanted a good singer and they got one! It's as simple as that.

Q… Following on from what was a very prolific time for you inexplicably take a very lengthy break why? 

I was still working, but you are talking about the punk era now, punk and disco two styles of music I wasn't going to have a go at. That was the stuff that was being played. Also I got ran over and hurt pretty bad which put me out of action longer than I intended and then we were into the "Boy George" phase. I did do some recording around about this time and played it to Polydor Records, and their A+R guy actually said to me "If you looked like Boy George I'd give you a deal" I said if I ended up looking like Boy George I'd jump off the Empire State Building, so that was the end of that, I thought I wait it out.

Q… There are a few outtakes on this new collection 

Yes there's some from the Mike Vernon period like "Man Of The World" the Peter Green "Fleetwood Mac" song which is fabulous, and never made any album at the time. There are also a couple of different versions of stuff singles from that time too. There's some live stuff too. .

Mike Vernon is acknowledged as one of the great British Blues record producers. 
He started his musical journey producing the earliest recordings by the "Yardbirds" before taking up the position as the in-house producer for Decca Records working with "The Artwoods" and "John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers".
In 1965 together with his brother Richard they set up the Blue Horizon record label, the first independent record company to actively promote British Blues and R+B.


Q…There's some great stuff on here from the live Marquee session.

Yes some fantastic songs "Mandy" "After Midnight" and "Only Women Bleed" 
I was still playing live a lot, so that side of things wasn't suffering that's why that's such a great album. Plus I was playing or guesting on other people's albums. I was always getting good offers, I'd been the second choice for vocalist in Led Zeppelin after Robert Plant, if he hadn't wanted to do it I'd have got it. John Bonham had played with me in "The Thunderbirds" long before he joined. I did an album with Jimmy Page called "Outrider" and the "Death Wish 2" sound track.


Q…Waiting in the Wings was an important album for you.

Yes that was a very good album we've put the track "On the Beach" which is a fabulous song and was written by Leo Lyons from Ten Years After, on this compilation . Pete Sinfield who wrote two songs for that album, he was the lyricist for "King Crimson".

Other tracks featured here are "Some Mothers Son" written by Chris and ex Whitesnake guitarist Micky Moody plus "Rock n' Roll Soldier" a song that sums up Chris Farlowe and spawns the title of this collection.


Q…What came next?

That would be "Lonesome Road" which was another live album I did in 95 there's not actually any thing from that but there is a song from that time called "I Don't Want To sing The Blues No More" which isn't off the album but it was in the set at the time so it was important to include a version. It's basically in there to emphasise the many different styles I was doing from the 70's onwards. That was a very bluesy album, and we put out a song called that.

Q… You are one of the few artists that can put out live albums that don't distract from what you do in the studio. By that I mean so many performers and band s complain that they can never quite capture their live sound on disc.

Yes I know it's a rare thing but I've always been lucky, I don't think my live albums sound like conventional live albums. They just sound like me doing what I do it doesn't matter if I'm making an album in the studio or a club, theatre or wherever. 

Q… Is that because you choose your material to suit? Or would you have a bash at pretty much anything and put it out warts an all. 

Now a day's I pick out the tracks with Kris Gray (manager) and there are certainly tracks I wouldn't put out like there's a dance track that was done of "Out Of Time"
I'd never include stuff like that. I suppose it was a bit of a stopgap thing really, I wanted to show I hadn't forgotten my blues routes.


Q… You changed tack pretty quickly following that though.

Yes I did I wanted to do an album of jazz standards in the sort of late night "Frank Sinatra" style which we called "As Time Goes By" and there's an outtake we found called "Remind Me" which never made the original. Dave Greenslade said to me when he heard it "That's brilliant that is, you could do a week at Ronnie Scott's doing that stuff, you'd never have to worry in your old age, you could do a Tony Bennett".

Q…That's an interesting observation, and brings me to the question why do you think, other than yourself of course England never produced a Sinatra, or a Bennett.

The record companies will tell you we do.

Q…It was around this time that your career almost came full circle and there was a rumour that you might sign to a new immediate record label supposedly being re-launched by Andrew Loog Oldham and Tony Calder, what was the story there?

What happened there was we did a programme called the white room in 1997 it was their New Years Eve show with Oasis and a house band, I think Paul Carrack was in it, and we did the "Small Faces" song "All Or Nothing" which was on the next album "The Voice". After that we got a call from Tony Calder who was Andrews long time partner and he said they were going to re-launch the label. He then said he wanted me to re-record "All Or Nothing" and it would be the first single. So that's what we did, we went in the studio and did it again along with "Handbags And Gladrags" and another "Small Faces" number "Tin Soldier". Needless to say nothing came of it and we ended up with the tracks, so the bonus track on this release is "Tin Soldier".

The voice was another great album the title was obviously a nod once again to Sinatra. Clem Clempson produced it and played all over it, along side a guy called Ricky Bird who was in Joan Jett's band. He came over from America and ended up writing two songs one of which is on the album a track called "Language Of The Heart" which is a great song.


Q…Which brings us to "Glory Bound" what material have you included from those sessions?

The title track, which was written by Mike D'Abo I love that song because I included it because it reminds me of a friend of mine who killed himself. Believe it or not he bought my album and said if he died would I play that track at his funeral. Two weeks later he was dead, threw himself in the Thames and sure enough I played it at his funeral. Lovely lyrics, beautiful.

Other tracks from "Glory Bound" are "Miss You Fever" written by Undertones front man Fergal Sharkey and another stage favourite " Tough on Me Tough on You". 


Q…That pretty well brings us up to date, apart from mentioning your latest release "Farlowe That" a great title, great reviews and another step forward. Where do you go from here?

Well I've just had the chief violinist from the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra on tour with us, and he said to me "Have you ever thought about doing Opera Chris, only I think you would be good at it". 



___________________________________________________________________________________________



So there you have it. It's the beginning of 2004 and Chris is indeed getting the best reviews in his career he finished 2003 on a particular high having completed several sell out tours in his own right, and as part of a reformed Colosseum. He's a frequent special guest on Van Morrison's own ceaseless sell out journey around the globe and he's planning a new album. So as I said before the Chris Farlowe story keeps on unfolding and maybe, just maybe those British Sinartra, and Bennett
Comparisons aren't that wide of the mark after all. 

One thing's for sure Chris farlowe is a Great British institution just like cricket on the green, HP Sauce, and a pint of Best, and for that we should all be grateful. 

SO FARLOWE GOOD. 

Terry Rawlings. 

Thanks to
Kris Gray..






www.chrisfarlowe.co.uk and www.deliciousrecords.co.uk